Saturday, September 20, 2014

52 Ancestors: #37 Jonathan Turner (1646-1724)



Jonathan Turner, my eighth great grandfather, was born on this date in 1646, in the Scituate Settlement of Plymouth Colony, the oldest of thirteen children born to John Turner and Mary Brewster, and their first son.

Jonathan's grandfather, Humphrey Turner, had been a tanner, and was one of the early Scituate settlers, one of only 17 organizers of the church at Scituate in 1634/5. This occupation carried through three generations to Jonathan.




Jonathan's mother, Mary Brewster was the granddaughter of William Brewster of Mayflower fame.

"Mayflower at Plymouth Harbor"


Jonathan married first Martha Bisbee of Scituate in 1677. The couple had five children:

Deborah, b. 1678
Jemima, b. 1680
Isaac, b. 1682
Keziah, b. 1685
and
Jonathan, b. 1687

He married a second time to Mercy Hatch, also of Scituate, around 1690. Together, they had six children:

Mercy, b. 1690
Ruth, b. 1693/4
Ignatius, b. 1697/8
Martha, b. 1700 (my 7th great grandmother)
Jesse, b. 1704
and
Mary, b. 1706

His third marriage was to Lydia Hayden of Braintree, a widow who was raising four daughters on her own. They had no children together.

Jonathan died on April 18, 1724, in Cohasset, Massachusetts.

Photo credit:

"Shoemaker," Colonial Williamsburg Journal, Summer 2007, Goods, by J. Hunter Barbour. (http://www.history.org/Foundation/journal/Summer07/trades.cfm)

"Mayflower in Plymouth Harbor," By William Halsall (http://www.artcom.com/Museums/vs/mr/02360-38.htm) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Sources:


Ancestry.com. Genealogical Dictionary of New England Settlers [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 1997.

Ancestry.com. Massachusetts, Town and Vital Records, 1620-1988 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.

Ancestry.com. Mayflower Births and Deaths, Vol. 1 and 2 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2013.

Ancestry.com. U.S., New England Marriages Prior to 1700 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2012, pp. 458-459.

Ancestry.com. Vital records of Scituate, Massachusetts to the year 1850 [database on-line]. Provo, UT: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2005.

Deane, Samuel. History of Scituate, Massachusetts, from its first settlement to 1831 (Boston: J. Loring), 1831, pp. 360-363.

Dodd, Jordan, Liahona Research, comp. Massachusetts, Marriages, 1633-1850 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2005.



Find A Grave, database and images (http://findagrave.com : accessed 20 Sep 2014), memorial page for Humphrey Turner (1593-1672), Find A Grave Memorial no. 21760860, citing Men of Kent Cemetery, Scituate, Plymouth County, Massachusetts.

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This is the 37th in a series, “52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks,” coordinated by Amy Johnson Crow at
 No Story Too Small.

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Monday, September 8, 2014

52 Ancestors: #36 Bartholomew Clayton (1801-1882)



Bartholomew Clayton, my fourth great grand uncle, was born on this date in 1801, in Farmington, Maine, the seventh of ten children born to John Clayton and Sarah Austin, and their third son.

Bartholomew appears as early as the 1830 Freeman, Maine, census, having married Mary P. Tarr in Salem, Maine, on March 25, 1829. She hailed from nearby Strong, the daughter of John Tarr and Mary Pettingill.

The couple farmed and raised a family in Freeman for over thirty years, and it is in his offspring that Bartholomew left a lasting legacy.

First-born Charles married Vermonter Ellen Towne, and lived to be 75.

Matilda Abigail married Granville Whitney, and died in Plymouth, Massachusetts.

Second son Edmund B. was a wounded, and then captured, Union cavalry soldier, dying of scurvy at Andersonville Prison, at age 31.

Third son, William Zoran, also fought for the Union, under the Minnesota Light Artillery flag, achieving the rank of Major, and is notable for having had his personal Bible stolen from him at Shiloh, yet returned to him years later, through an inscription in its pages.

Second daughter, Harriet A., married Russell Topliffe Chamberlin, who served with the U.S. Signal Corps during the Civil War.

Next came Rufus Marcellus, who served in the 1st Maine Cavalry during the Civil War. He traveled West after the War, and died in Minnesota.

Third daughter, Marrietta, married Alonzo Davis, and settled in southern California. She is buried in Forest Lawn.

Son number five, Collamore Purrington, also served with the 1st Maine Cavalry, and joined his older brother Rufus in Minnesota.

Archibald Talbot, A.T., came next. He died in Boston in 1866, at the age of 21. Cause of death was "Marasmus," a form of malnutrition.

The youngest, a daughter named Ariana, lived only to the age of six, and is buried in Starbird Corner Cemetery, in Freeman.

Ten children, four of whom fought for the Union, three in the 1st Maine Cavalry.

Bartholomew passed away exactly one month after his wife, Mary, on February 4, 1882, and they are buried together in Lakeview Cemetery, in Hampden, Maine.


Photo credit : Carolyn Clark Corey
in response to my photo request on
Find A Grave


Sources:

1830 US Census; Census Place: Freeman, Somerset, Maine; Series: M19; Roll: 51; Page: 172; Family History Library Film: 0497947, Bartholomew Clayton.

1840 US Census; Census Place: Freeman, Franklin, Maine; Roll: 140; Page: 64; Image: 133; Family History Library Film: 0009703, Barth Clayton.

1850 US Census; Census Place: Freeman, Franklin, Maine; Roll: M432_253; Page: 229A; Image: 443, Bartholomew Clayton.

1860 US Census; Census Place: Freeman, Franklin, Maine; Roll: M653_435; Page: 852; Image: 267; Family History Library Film: 803435, Bartholomew Clayton.

1870 US Census; Census Place: Hampden, Penobscot, Maine; Roll: M593_554; Page: 60B; Image: 125; Family History Library Film: 552053, Bartholomew Clayton.

1880 US Census; Census Place: Hampden, Penobscot, Maine; Roll: 486; Family History Film: 1254486; Page: 323C; Enumeration District: 035; Image: 0247, Bartholomew Clayton.

Ancestry.com. Andersonville Prisoners of War [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 1999.

Ancestry.com. Massachusetts, Death Records, 1841-1915 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2013.

Ancestry.com. Massachusetts, Marriage Records, 1840-1915 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2013.

Find A Grave, database and images (http://findagrave.com : accessed 7 Sep 2014), memorial page for
Ariana Clayton (unknown-1855), Find A Grave Memorial no.107453155, citing Starbird Corner Cemetery, Franklin County, Maine.

Find A Grave, database and images (http://findagrave.com : accessed 7 Sep 2014), memorial page for Barthol Clayton (1875-1945), Find A Grave Memorial  no.24360526, citing Lakeview Cemetery, Hampden, Maine.

A History of Farmington, Franklin County, Maine : from the earliest explorations to the present time, 1776-1885. (Ancestry.com).

"Maine, Marriages, 1771-1907," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/F4FT-855 : accessed 07 Sep 2014), Bartholomew Clayton and Mary Tarr, 25 Mar 1829; citing Salem,Franklin,Maine, reference ; FHL microfilm 253240.


U.S., Civil War Soldier Records and Profiles, 1861-1865 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2009.

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This is the 36th in a series, “52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks,” coordinated by Amy Johnson Crow at
 No Story Too Small.

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Monday, September 1, 2014

52 Ancestors: #35 Stephen Leighton (1804-1820?)



Stephen Leighton, my third great grand uncle, was born on this date in 1804 in North Yarmouth, Maine, the eleventh of twelve children born to Andrew Leighton and Mary Weymouth, and their ninth son.

His father, known as Captain Andrew, had laid out the county road from Falmouth to Portland, and was a prosperous lumber trader, dealing in ship's timber.  In 1800, he built and operated Leighton's Tavern on the Gray Road in West Cumberland. It was a popular stop on the stage route to Lewiston.

Stephen's two oldest brothers, Joseph, born in 1789, and Andrew, born in 1790. were both lost at sea off the Georges Bank in 1815, while aboard the privateer Dash. Stephen would have been 10 or 11 years old at the time, old enough to share in the family's loss.


Illustration : The Story of DASH 
Freeport (Me.) Historical Society 


Nonetheless, young Stephen did not retreat from a life aboard ship, and it is noted that he, too, was lost at sea. Assuming youth of his generation frequently put to sea in their early teens, one imagines him perishing around age 16, in 1820. No written recollection has been found.

Sources:

Leighton, Perley M. A Leighton genealogy: descendants of Thomas Leighton of Dover, New Hampshire. Compiled by Perley M. Leighton based in part on data collected by Julia Leighton Cornman. (Boston: New England Historic Genealogical  Society, 1989.) p. 282.


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This is the 35th in a series, “52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks,” coordinated by Amy Johnson Crow at No Story Too Small.

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Saturday, August 30, 2014

52 Ancestors: #34 Beniah Pratt Brackley (1833-1896)



Beniah Pratt Brackley, my 1st cousin 5x removed, was born on this date in 1833, in Freeman, Maine, the seventh of eight children born to John Brackley and Mary Trumble, and their sixth son.

Beniah lived in Freeman until his early teen years, but eventually made his way to the coast of Maine, settling in Rockland, answering the call of the sea. He signed on to a fishing voyage with his older brother Silas for three months, and may have made it all the way to Cuba with him. There is evidence he also worked on the Boston and Lowell Canal for a time. In the 1860 Rockland census, he listed his occupation as "sailor."



He met Fannie Ulmer there, and married her in Rockland on May 9th in 1861.  Two years later, the couple welcomed their only child, a daughter Elizabeth, whom they called Lizzie.

Beniah answered the Union call and enlisted at Augusta on February 22, 1864, in the 4th Maine Regiment of Volunteers. After one year, he was promoted to Lieutenant. His second enlistment was with the 31st Maine, where he rose again in rank from Private to Lieutenant. He fought in the Battle of Bull Run, and witnessed the surrender of General Lee at Appomattox.



At the end of the war, Beniah returned to Rockland and joined the police force. In the 1870 census, he listed his occupation as "police man." After about ten years, he held various civic positions in Rockland and Knox County.

Beniah lost his wife in 1894, and followed her in death two years later, dying on February 4, 1896, of what later came to be known as Parkinson's Disease.

He and Fannie are buried in the Achorn Cemetery, in Rockland, Maine. I hope to find and photograph their graves on my next trip to Maine.




Sources:

1850 US Census ; Census Place: Freeman, Franklin, Maine; Roll: M432_253; Page: 231A; Image: 447, Beniah Brackley.

1860 US Census; Census Place: Rockland, Knox, Maine; Roll: M653_443; Page: 728; Image: 728; Family History Library Film: 803443, Beniah I Brackly.

1870 US Census ; Census Place: Rockland, Knox, Maine; Roll: M593_548; Page: 172B; Image: 348; Family History Library Film: 552047, Benniah Brackley.

1880 US Census ; Census Place: Rockland, Knox, Maine; Roll: 482; Family History Film: 1254482; Page: 160A; Enumeration District: 109; Image: 0807, Bennia P. Brackley.

1890 Veterans Schedule; Census Place: Rockland, Knox, Maine; Roll: 7; Page: 5; Enumeration District: 204, Beniah P Brockley.

"Maine, Marriages, 1771-1907," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/F4NH-GLD : accessed 30 Aug 2014), Beniah P. Brackley and Fannie P. Ulmer, 09 May 1861; citing Rockland,Knox,Maine, reference ; FHL microfilm 12045.

"Maine, Veterans Cemetery Records, 1676-1918", index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/KXQC-NN3 : accessed 30 Aug 2014), B P Brackley, 1896.

Thompson, George A. and F. Janet Thompson. A Genealogical history of Freeman, Maine, 1796-1938, in three volumes. 3 vols. (Bowie, Maryland: Heritage Books, 1996), 1:340.


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This is the 34th in a series, “52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks,” coordinated by Amy Johnson Crow at No Story Too Small.

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